Tag: cuny academic commons

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York College Students NET-ART the Commons.


March 2018

Im happy to finally publish and share some of the results generated from the fall semester of 2017.  The works were submitted by my CT101 -Digital Storytelling students at York College specifically for the NET-ART website on the CommonsBoth sections of the course contributed to two collaborative projects. The process for these pieces are generated quickly in an energy of immediacy as students were asked to work intuitively to generate their results. Part of the process is to simply ALLOW what one feels creatively impulsed to do, and not block or judge the process as good or bad. It is not an easy feet in a world where we have so much control over the way we use, receive and send communication via our mobile devices. Students suspended their judgements and engaged in the curation, composing, expressing and publishing of their works using various web tools for both desktop and mobile. These are the first iterations where results were produced. We used these pieces as the stepping stones of assessment and contrast.

1. Above, students experimented with creating Vapor Wave style net-art works using selected fragments of Internet culture, graphic assets and digital media from the web. Multiple skill sets were learned and applied. Both Desktop and mobile applications were experimented with (all of which can be found here on this website). The Vapor Wave pieces were contributed by students after screen recording their work using quicktime and converting the short videos into animated GIFs. It was decided upon by the class to show the works in a slide show format.

2. Below, Students participated in the GIF the Portrait project by first creating individual portrait GIFS. They were then asked to extract one frame from the sequence of manipulated frames that makes up the whole animation. They worked from people (fictional characters included) that inspired them. Students had to alter each portrait and remove the background contents to create a collaborative sequence of layers in a constant flow of change and transition…with no time delays of course.

Both projects are an introduction to converting static images into motion graphics and animations. Once you start, you can never stop!

Would you or your class like to participate in a project on the Net-Art site? Get in touch – rseslow@york.cuny.edu

Weekend Video Art Screening: Les Grands Ensembles & Tango

Please screen the video art works above and below and respond in the comments section below.

 

1. “Les Grands Ensembles” by Pierre Huyghe (1994–2001) – (Above)

(I was lucky enough to screen this piece above in full scale at the Guggenheim in 2002).

“On October 16, 2002, Pierre Huyghe was awarded the fourth biennial Hugo Boss Prize. Inaugurated in 1996, the prize was conceived to recognize and support contemporary artists making profound contributions to the cultural landscape. Huyghe has gained international prominence for works that explore the convergence of reality and fiction, memory and history. Incorporating film, video, sound, animation, sculpture, and architecture in his diverse works, the artist intervenes in familiar narrative structures to investigate the construction of collective and individual identities in relationship to various forms of cultural production. Huyghe is interested in both reading and making possible multiple, subjective reinterpretations of incidents and images that shape our realities. Through such retranslations, Huyghe offers a way for his characters and his viewers to take back control of their own images, their own stories.”

“At the Guggenheim, Huyghe presents a film installation, Les Grands Ensembles (1994–2001) that address alternative modes of representation and communication (the work has been compared to the attempts at contact in Close Encounters of the Third Kind). In Les Grands Ensembles a pair of bleak buildings, models based on 1970s French housing projects, enacts a subtle inanimate drama. Enveloped in fog, the uninhabited scene is both romantic and alienating. “These subsidized public projects ended up being an architectural and social failure,” explains Huyghe. “They were a corruption of Le Corbusier’s social and architectural Modernist theory.” Though meant to be temporary, these structures are still here, much as we may try to ignore them. Huyghe brings the buildings into view and gives them agency. “Without beginning or ending,” he says, “the two low-income towers dialogue in a strange Morse code given by the light of their respective windows, a blinking existence.”

Source Via – https://www.guggenheim.org/exhibition/hugo-boss-prize-2002-pierre-huyghe

 

2. “Tango” by Zbigniew Rybczyński  – 1980.

Tango is set in one room with an increasing number and series of interesting characters that loop in and out of the composition over and over.

Can you stop watching? Tango won The Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film in 1983.

 

Questions to ponder and react to:

Tango is considered a “short animated film”, but is this a film? How would you describe it in 2018?

How would you describe both pieces technically? The year they were made plays a role for sure. Or does it?

What did you think of “Tango” and “Les Grands Ensembles” as a whole?

What is your interpretation of each piece? What is the artist communicating?

Does the art work(s) induce personal reflection in anyway? If so please share.

Do you find connections between these two works of Media Art? If so, please describe?

Please leave your reactions and responses in the comments section below.