Category: Digital Art

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Open Call for Submissions – FILE Festival – Sao Paulo

Great opportunity to submit your work!

Check it out!

 

What is FILE?

 

FILE – Electronic Language International Festival is a non-profit cultural organization that sparks a reflexion on the main aspects of contemporary digital and electronic universe; disseminating the electronic language across Brazil and South America through events and publications since the year 2000.

FILE gathers works of aesthetic expression that capture the main trends and movements of our contemporary culture, which are diversified amongst the main categories of the festival:

Electronic Sonority: Sound Performance, Sound Installations, Sound Art, Genetic Music, Biologic Music, Classical Electronic Music, Pop Electronic Music, Dramatic Radio Broadcasting, Radio Art, Sound Landscape, Sound Robotics, Music Video, Sound Poetry, Sound Robotics, etc.

Interactive Art: installations, performances, internet projects, virtual reality, augmented reality, multitouch tables, digital objects, outdoor projections, phone projects, electronic graffiti, VRML, etc.

Digital Language: digital games, animation, digital theatre, machinima, digital video, digital architecture, digital fashion, digital design, robotics, artificial life, biological art, transgenic art, software art, new interfaces, animes, hypertexts, non-linear scripts, artificial intelligence, programming language, digital poetry, digital dance, etc.

Founded in the year 2000 by Ricardo Barreto and Paula Perissinotto, FILE aims to magnify technological discussions in the cultural scope. Besides the traditional annual event in São Paulo city, the festival expands itself across national and international borders to cities such as Rio de Janeiro, Vitória, Belo Horizonte, Curitiba, Porto Alegre, São Luis and Brasilia.

FILE’s mission is to promote a wider access from the general public to technologic languages demonstrating how our contemporary world builds itself on the advances of new and digital medias.

 

https://file.org.br/highlight/opencall_file2020/

The Cross College, Campus, Course ZINE Collab Project!

Project Title –  “The Cross College, Campus, Course ZINE Collab Project!”

Participating Courses & Campuses:

Professor Michelle McAuliffe’s :: – ART255, Digital Photography Class – Galluadet University, Washington, DC

Professor Ryan Seslow’s :: – CUNY York College, NYC, CT101, Digital Storytelling Class, CUNY, BMCC, NYC, Foundations of Digital Graphic Design Class, Touro College, Graduate School of Technology, NYC, Foundations & History of Design Class.

(4 different participating courses submitted works in total)

Description –

Welcome! This project is a collaborative open education exploration using design, digital tools, the creative human potential and the Internet. It is our intention to generate, discuss and fuse together disciplines through visual communication.

The “The Cross College, Campus, Course ZINE Collab Project” project synthesizes the disciplines of communication technology, graphic design, and digital storytelling courses across multiple campuses. Each course is given the same information and assignment (below) to complete from the perspective of their class content and personal experiences.

As individual courses, we are interested in knowing how traditional design principles relate and contrast with the medium of visual communication and storytelling (and vice versa). We want to understand and share how the use of integrated software applications and web tools translate when applied and presented in a public space. “Public space” has an interesting context both physically and virtually. We wanted to test both.

What will the results be both digitally and non-digitally-(Analog)?

How will the immediacy of publishing to the Internet and the contrast of using public library spaces to experience the same content effect the overall generating and receiving of the works?

What kind of dialog would this create? (This is the short list of questions, we have many more!)

This project begins today 11/12/2019 by introducing the specifications of the project and publicly inviting other professors, students and courses to join in! Are you interested?

 

PART 1 – Design

Design  SpecificationsLets simulate, You have been selected to contribute 1 page to a collaborative magaZINE that produces a rare publication in both a (DIY) Do it Yourself printed edition and an online digital version.

 

*Your submission to the publication will creatively communicate an illustration that displays how:

“Technology and creativity are powerful tools for fueling communication, inspiration, digital-storytelling and design.”

You have the creative freedom to produce and generate your contribution with full autonomy as to how you experience or define this statement above, however, your final submission should display an integrated composition of imagery (use of layers and opacity) along with descriptive verbiage that has been typeset creatively.

 

*Size Requirements – 8.5″ X 11″ inches vertical, please. (What is the potential of a rectangle?)

Usage of Imagery Participants should NOT randomly use images that are simply just found on the Internet, especially with-out proper attribution to its creator. Please refer to this resource page and work from the numerous repositories of public domain images and creative commons sources. (Yes, you can make your own images and use your own art work!)

Software Skill Showcase – Over the past weeks we have all toggled through learning various techniques and methods working with adobe photoshop and related design tools. All image related composing and manipulations should be generated in photoshop, or another image-making application that allows for a saved out-put as a .jpg or .png file.

Completed Submissions – 

1. I would like to ask all students and participants to publish their completed pages as a blog post describing the process and meaning of your completed page / contribution. You may write the post as a tutorial that maps your process from start to finish. You can then share the link to your individual post when you comment about the project below (in the comments area).

2. Students will save all of their design work and submit one file (.jpeg or .png image file) for both the digital zine publication here on the NET-ART website as well as a printed copy for the print version of the Zine.

( E-mail this file to me – rseslow@york.cuny.edu or rseslow@bmcc.cuny.edu )

 

The Galleries:

 

Professor Michelle McAuliffe’s – ART255, Digital Photography Class, Galluadet University, Washington, DC (below)

 

Professor Ryan Seslow’s – CUNY York College, NYC, CT101, Digital Storytelling Class, (below)

 

Professor Ryan Seslow’s – CUNY, BMCC, NYC, Foundations of Digital Graphic Design Class

 

Professor Ryan Seslow’s – Touro College, Graduate School of Technology, NYC, Foundations & History of Design Class (below)

 

Part 2 – Commenting & Dialog

In the comments section below: all students and participants will respond and react to both the project as a whole (yes, in the comments space directly below) and individually to each other’s submissions. You can click on an individual image in the gallery in this post on the piece that stands out to you and add your comments. (As submissions the come in they will appear starting the 1st week of December 2019).

The Academic Commons is a public platform and space for CUNY and beyond, the C.A.C commons community will also be invited to participate in commenting and creating dialog here. Feel free to invite others!

Please consider addressing the following questions in your comments:

*What common threads or similarities do you see between the submitted works?

*What differences do you see?

*How does seeing all of the works organized into one “space” enhance or disrupt your interpretation of the project and its outcome?

*How will apply this experience into your life? Where will this knowledge transcend for you?

*How do you think the general public will appreciate the project viewing it as a tangible object (the printed ZINES) rather than an online experience? Do you prefer one over the other? Please explain and describe your answers.  The printed zine will be donated to the NYPL’s Zine collection at their 5th Avenue & 42nd Street location – DeWitt Wallace Periodical Room at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building 

as well also being available at the Libraries of each participating campus as of mid-spring of 2020. 

 

*Due dates –

All ART work Submissions must be received no later than Thursday December 5th, 2019.

All comments, reaction and discussion submissions must be completed below by Thursday December 12th, 2019.

Check out the previous examples from the last cross campus zine collab here! 

The same specifications were used, lets see how things have evolved in the last 2 years!

Have Questions? Reach out!

 

Why Should I Make a Portfolio?

Why Should I Make a Portfolio?

Wait, what exactly is a portfolio? There seems to be a context…or is there?

Let’s define it, and perhaps there is metaphoric value and context in each one of these “traditional definition” examples below..

According to Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary:

Definition of “portfolio”:

1a hinged cover or flexible case for carrying loose papers, pictures, or pamphlets

2: from the use of such a case to carry documents of statethe office and functions of a minister of state or member of a cabinet

3the securities held by an investorthe commercial paper held by a financial house (such as a bank)

4a set of pictures (such as drawings or photographs) usually bound in book form or loose in a folder

5a selection of a student’s work (such as papers and tests) compiled over a period of time and used for assessing performance or progress

Hold up, whoa! I can already feel your inner physiological triggers sending a bright red waving flag to your ego saying: “but making a portfolio is sooooo much work!”.

Guess what?

LET, AND ALLOW FOR THIS HAPPEN!

It is perfectly normal and alright to let your “old-portfolio-definition-self” bleed out. Exercise that energy. Let’s release it. Ill wait….Take a breath, and let’s remind ourselves that things need to be replaced and upgraded. Nothing is static. We learn, we grow, we expand and we can’t allow past experiences to drive the bus on new opportunities and new ways of seeing, experiencing and re-defining things. 

The word “portfolio” is not a bad word. If anything, like anything else, it’s a default term that officially requires your interaction, research, resonance and re-defining within context to who you are and who you are becoming in the process! With that said, let’s think about what the next step is in creating your new portfolio.

Let us understand the “why” part. Why do I need a portfolio? What is the purpose?

Here is a short list (feel free to add more to your updated definition)

  1. To showcase a body of your work. This is obvious, but curating and organizing things with intention becomes very specific. It activates a higher level of awareness and attention to the process / project. You will learn how to get selective, and this takes practice.

2. To show off your strengths, creativity, skills, effectiveness, efficiency, enthusiasm and passion! Of course, this energy translates directly through the work included in the portfolio. This will be what you believe is your best work at the time, but there is context. Keep reading.. (PS – it’s OK to have more than one portfolio to help showcase various bodies of works and projects.) For example, I’m an applied artist, a digital artist, animation-maker, graphic-designer and a professor of art and design. Some of the works in my portfolio can overlap in theory but I keep a lot of the works separate to subject, but enjoy showcasing them together on my website. That’s right, my website is my portfolio. In fact, I have created a few, the links are below to help.

3. Display your process and evolution. Duration is your friend! Nothing shows off progress better than time. A metric of growth shows itself through time. When I look back at the design work I was doing 10 years ago in comparison to today I see an incredible difference in skill, technique, taste and where my thinking and focus was at the time. I also find a lot of ideas that can be pushed and expanded upon with more with my “awareness-of-growth eyes.” I write a lot about my work and share my process. I believe that this helps me reflect and explain myself better.

4. Stand out and show your style and authenticity – There is only one “you” that you can be. Yes, we certainly learn and are greatly inspired and influenced by others, but at the end of the day we must learn how to be our authentic selves. We must learn how to translate that through our mediums of choice. How will you do this? The short answer is through consistent experimentation and practice. Over time you will create your inner curator, and that part of yourself will begin putting pieces together in groups and compartments. The process will build and flow. This aspect is a journey and it too is anything from static. I take great interest in making changes, learning new things and applying them to the foundations that I continue to build.

 

OK, all easier said than done… or is it you ask?

I hope that this post will inspire you to begin! Be patient with yourself. The goal is not to create a portfolio in one hour, and there is no such thing as “perfection”. or the perfect portfolio. Let’s produce a result and discuss that result. Be generous with yourself in the process. 

I admit it. I love to experiment, test, tweak, deconstruct, remix and repeat processes. I treat the creation process of such a task, creating a new portfolio, the same way that I approach making art. Suspend your judgement! Allow yourself to “make something that may really suck” as a first iteration. This is crucial to developing a contrast of your own. Again, you need to produce a result in order to make an assessment about the result. Until you do this, your contrast is someone else’s stuff / thing that has inspired or affected you.

I would like for you to consider both of these portfolio building and displaying options below. Im a huge fan of both the Academic Commons and the OpenLab platforms. (If you are reading this and are not a part of CUNY somehow, then you can easily follow along individually as both the commons and the OpenLab are powered by WordPress.) Using your own self-hosted WordPress based website and account via ReclaimHosting.com – I have created a sample and template / example using both the Academic Commons, OpenLab and my own self-hosted projects that go into the process. I consider all of these links below to be portfolios. Perhaps you have a preference over one or the other? I hope that these links below will help you get started.

 

Lets check out a few examples:

  1. A portfolio website “How-to” example using the CUNY Academic Commons: https://profryanseslow.commons.gc.cuny.edu/

2. A portfolio website “How-to” example using the OpenLab: https://openlab.bmcc.cuny.edu/portfolio-ryan-seslow/

3. My personal website- this is my own domain and my own self-hosted website (WordPress) – https://ryanseslow.com

4. This is also my own domain and a self-hosted website to showcase a body of work (WordPress) – https://Situationalfiction.com

5. Of course, the NET-ART website here on the commons also functions as a portfolio and online platform for various galleries, blog posts, online exhibitions and selected works. Take a tour.

6. Looking for more examples? Contact me, lets chat!

 

Feel free to leave your questions and feedback in the comments section below! Lets add to this post together!

Or contact me at – rseslow@bmcc.cuny.edu

 

LaGuardia CC Linguistic Landscape Students Rock the Digital!

 

GIF the Portrait, A Collaborative Contribution, ELL101, Spring 2019

About the Project:

Faculty Instructor: Inés Vañó García
Teaching Artist: Ryan Seslow
ELL 101, Introduction to Language
LaGuardia Community College

ELL 101, Introduction to Language students from LaGuardia Community College submitted a wonderful array of works in the Linguistic Landscapes project, which is also a cog in the Pressing Public Issue project

For the purpose of this project, we stressed how our languages and language practices influence the way we interact with people and how language(s) relates to our role in society. Considering the symbolic construction of the public sphere in NYC, we explored and examined the linguistic landscape of Jackson Heights, in Queens. This approximation aimed to explore the linguistic diversity of the area in context: from a visual/written perspective (public road signs, advertising billboards, street names, place names, commercial shop signs, among other public signs) as well as from a speaking/aural one (interviews, music, background conversations). As a community, we were critical researchers and creators of a digital storytelling that investigated the multilingual and multi-literate sociolinguistic ecology of Queens.

Following this digital storytelling methodology, students discovered and learned about the linguistic diversity in Jackson Heights and how languages shape this public sphere. This project allowed students to investigate different forms and shapes of literacy and to analyze the multilingual and multi-literate sociolinguistic ecology of the neighborhood. Based on our readings, discussions and inquiry, we found an analysis of language ideologies that precipitates the understanding of  the power relations between individuals, groups and communities.

“This final project had the potential to have a temporary physical exhibition at the James Gallery as well as a permanent online presence.”

We are proud to share our outcomes here on the Net Art Website!

View the course website

York College CT101 Digital Storytelling MEMEs

Carrying on the CT101 tradition, Digital Storytelling students at York College expressed their feelings towards their CT101 class by investigating and generating Internet MEMEs. Students were introduced to working with Adobe photoshop, applying images from the web and adding a text overlay.

Art MEMES ART?

Well, this is broad question, individual blog posts were generated by each student on the ct101.us website to answer and adress the question. This collection continues the tradition on the Net-Art community platform!