Category: Digital Art

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The Contemplation of Metaphoric Flight, A Creative Teaching Template

“We need a caption, Phil, I don’t want to disappoint Roz again, help me out here”

Countless memories, the sea air and the seemingly creative blunders of reflective such-ness..what will you contribute to the process?

This is a manipulated image, its a silly one, or perhaps you resonate with it seriously? Either way, we need to adjust the contrast of the art work, please help by listing some of the options we can apply.

This is great fodder for creative inducement, consider the potential of how images speak to us, especially finding value in the subjective. What will you “allow” yourself to share?

Contrasts can be oh so subtle, they can disrupt the default patterns, this is a metaphor! How will you disrupt the pattern to bypass the part of you that clings to the familiar?

OK, patterns can also be very COOL! Patterns are about order, but order is in need of an integration of variety every so often, OK, this is another metaphor, see the pattern? 🙂

A little bit of movement goes a long long way! A little bit of texture goes a long way as well. Seems to me that creative variety is more accessible than we may think..

Ahem, you get the message, right?

“The Contemplation of Metaphoric Flight”, 2019, is a series of digital art illustrations & GIF animations generated from public domain source images via the NYPL digital archives. The illustrations were created by your old friend, Ryan Seslow. The new series of works above were specifically created to be displayed here on the C.A.C as a part of the Net Art website’s ongoing exhibition series. It is intended to serve as a visual example, an accessible template, and the creative potential for displaying, publishing, presenting and archiving such a project. (The whole thing is a metaphor)

Wait! Am I suggesting that an online exhibition, published as a blog post on a unique cross-campus social media network can also be used as a teaching tool? A transparent pedagogical tactic?! Well, yes, yes, I am! Lets dig in.

The original public domain images were cut-out with the pen-tool, composed and applied using adobe photoshop (photoshop is your friend and loves you). Do you need a photoshop pen-tool / cut-out video tutorial? Go Here – The cut-outs were necessary for the first iteration of the static pictures above. (Im referring to the bird portraits and the human clothes used to place their heads onto and into) The cut-outs are handy as they can be saved as both .psd files (the original photoshop documents) and as a transparent .PNG file. The .PNG files have a transparent background, this makes it easy to layer them over and into existing images. Plus they are forever re-usable (variation, variation, variation). But, Ryan, I don’t have access to Photoshop… OK, well, there is a trail versions! Sign up and try it! But after that trail ends, so that you know, photoshop is not required to do any of this. Web applications like Pixlr are free and accessible for all to use in the browser window itself, er, with access to the Internet of course.. OK, you can just download the .PNG files here in ready to use mode (your welcome). 

Click here to access my database, this includes all spiritual GIF making insights and alchemy tactics to engage students!

OK, so, there are a few animations above as well. The first animations above were created in adobe after effects. The renders were pushed to my iPhone and into mobile applications like Glitche (yikes, its only for iOS) and iPhone’s “Clips” video sequence maker (there are alternatives for android) The files can be saved as mp4 or .mov files making it easy to apply the videos into other mobile video editing apps. Filters are fun to play with for more customizing and visual effects. The videos can be looped into GIF animations using great apps like ImgPlay (this app is awesome, it re-sizes, edits, and has multiple out-put sources.) Animated GIFs are great extenders of so many forms of communication! Im hooked on making GIFS! I make them all public domain by adding them to Giphy.com so by all means use them at will! Here is my feed.

Of course, the digital art, illustration, collage, GIF animation aspect can be a great creative course project in and of itself! Indeed, both on an individual level but perhaps collaborating is where the extended creativity and learning takes place. This can be achieved through digital storytelling using a blogging platform just like this one. See that, you find yourself “inside the actual example”! The illustrations above clearly required a caption, captions and or a narrative. Is the narrative fictional? Will you write a short story to support the images or maybe a reflection induced by the sequences of images? What references come to mind or coincide? How can you make the description compelling? Will you share hyperlinks to your references and resources? Will you embed animated GIFs or other snippets of relevant content? Can you recompose this blog post and use it as a metaphoric template for your own class project, assignment, syllabus or exhibition? (Hint, you can easily break free of the digital art example, but it might be fun to play with this as an idea.)

I believe that this example / template series will expand, who wants to collaborate on a creative cross campus project?

And seriously, have FUN with this!

 

Today! Pressing Public Issues Presentations and Exhibition Launch!

We hope to see you today, ThursdayMay 30th from 12:00 to 2:00 PM in the James Gallery at the Graduate Center CUNY for “Pressing Public Issues: Presentations and Exhibition Launch. Please join faculty and students from across CUNY community colleges, and teaching artists for presentations and an exhibition launch of Pressing Public Issues to learn about their experiences designing and facilitating creative modes of research, expression, knowledge-production and public scholarship to spark challenging and productive conversations within their campuses, their local communities, the broader CUNY community, and across New York City.

 

Free and open to all, click here or see below for more information about this event and collaborative project. Join and share on Facebook here. Also, join us in the James Gallery on Mon, June 3rd from 6:30-8pm for a related discussion and reception for Pressing Public Issues.

Bronx Community College students from the “Black Land Ownership” class worked with artist Walis Johnson to install Red Line Labyrinth 
on Bronx Community College main quad, as part of the Pressing Public Issues collaboration.

 

Pressing Public Issues Presentations and Exhibition Launch

 

Thu, May 30th, 12:00pm to 2:00pm, the James Gallery at the Graduate Center, CUNY, 365 Fifth Ave, NYC

Please join faculty and students from across CUNY community colleges, and teaching artists for presentations and an exhibition launch of Pressing Public Issues to learn about their experiences designing and facilitating creative modes of research, expression, knowledge-production and public scholarship to spark challenging and productive conversations within their campuses, their local communities, the broader CUNY community, and across New York City.

Students, faculty and teaching artists from three of the six Pressing Public Issues courses will share their creative work, and speak about their semester-long process of exploring particular issues of importance to them through a variety of creative mediums:

·       In ‘Linguistic Landscapes: Unpacking Language Hierarchies’ at La Guardia Community College, students explored and examined the linguistic landscape of their school as well as Jackson Heights, how language(s) shape these public spheres, and reflected on their experiences of this linguistic exploration through digital storytelling projects. At the launch students will be presenting their final projects. This project was led by CUNY faculty instructor Inés Vañó García and artist Ryan Seslow.

·       In ‘Asian American History: “What a test never taught me…”’ at Borough of Manhattan Community College, students unpacked myths of meritocracy, culture, and success as it relates to Asian Americans and education in the U.S. Students examined their individual and community educational histories to express different “push-out” and “pull-in” factors, or, structural issues that prevent and encourage us to stay on our educational paths. The art installation of students’ collages and scantrons, is a visual culmination of their semester-long collaborative work. This project was led by CUNY faculty instructor Soniya Munshi and artist Melissa Liu.

·       In ‘Black Land Ownership’ at Bronx Community College, students explored how a systematic lack of access to land and property ownership for African Americans over 400 years of U.S. History has led to massive wealth inequality today. In collaboration with artist Walis Johnson, the class culminated in the installation of the public art participatory project Red Line Labyrinth on BCC’s historic Stanford White campus. This project was led by CUNY faculty instructor Prithi Kanakamedala and artist Walis Johnson.

Spearheaded by a partnership between the James Gallery, the Teaching and Learning and Center, and the CUNY Humanities AlliancePressing Public Issues has brought together a cohort of six teaching artists and six faculty teaching courses in various disciplines at CUNY community colleges in Spring 2019.

The Pressing Public Issues exhibition of students’ work from all six CUNY community college courses will be on public display at the James Gallery from May 30th – June 15th, 2019. Gallery hours: Wed 2-4pm, Thu 2-7pm, Fri 2-4pm.

And please join us in the James Gallery on Mon, June 3rd from 6:30-8pm for a related discussion and reception for Pressing Public Issues.

Co-sponsored by the James Gallery, the Teaching and Learning and Center, and the CUNY Humanities Alliance.